Tag Archives: High Resolution Imagery

The Fate of U.S. Commercial Satellite Imagery – Why You Should Care – GeoEye Feature in Article

Satellite imagery was something that the general public did not have access to before 2005. People caught glimpses of the stories satellite imagery could tell only from documentaries produced from the likes of Nova and National Geographic. Google Earth changed all that June 2005 and made satellite imagery accessible to anyone with a computer, for free. Google Earth has inspired the world to think differently about the earth because it has made these images accessible.

But what’s the source of all this satellite imagery (or what is termed Earth observation)? There are lots of free, government sources of satellite imagery like Landsat, and weather satellites from NASA and NOAA, but these are not high-resolution satellites that can zoom in on your house, or support 3D modeling for engineering and virtual reality-type applications. High-resolution imagery (sub-meter—that’s less than 40 inches) for commercial use is currently only available from GeoEye, DigitalGlobe, Astrium Geo, and ImageSat. GeoEye and DigitalGlobe represent approximately 75% of this market, and 2/3 of their revenue is tied to the U.S. government…

View the full article

About GeoEye

Want to see more stunning and inspiring images?
GeoEye Facebook Fan Page
@GeoEye on Twitter
GeoEye on Google Plus
GeoEye on LinkedIn
GeoEye’s Flickr photo stream


New GeoEye High Resolution Imagery Released of Pausylipon Archeological Site and Seiano Grotto West of Naples, Italy

Welcome to the GeoEye Image Gallery.

A new image of the GeoEye-1 collection of Pausylipon Archeological Site and Seiano Grotto West of Naples, Italy has just been released on the GeoEye website.

Click here to check it out.

About GeoEye

Want to see more stunning and inspiring images?
GeoEye Facebook Fan Page
@GeoEye on Twitter
GeoEye on Google Plus
GeoEye on LinkedIn
GeoEye’s Flickr photo stream


ITT Exelis Delivers Imaging System for Next-Generation, High-Resolution GeoEye-2 Satellite – GeoEye

ITT Exelis (NYSE: XLS) Geospatial Systems has delivered GeoEye‘s next-generation commercial imaging system for the GeoEye-2 satellite to Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company in Sunnyvale, Calif. When operational in 2013, GeoEye-2 will deliver the highest resolution and most accurate color imagery to GeoEye‘s commercial, government and international customers.

The Exelis-built imaging payload for GeoEye-2 includes a telescope, sensor subsystem and outer barrel assembly and has the potential to capture panchromatic ground sample distance imagery of the Earth‘s surface at 0.34-meter, or 13.38-inch, ground resolution…

View the press release

About GeoEye

Want to see more stunning and inspiring images?
GeoEye Facebook Fan Page
@GeoEye on Twitter
GeoEye on Google Plus
GeoEye on LinkedIn
GeoEye’s Flickr photo stream


North Korea Rocket Launch May Be Near – GeoEye High Resolution Imagery Featured in Article

Seoul, South Korea — North Korea may have moved the first stage of a rocket to a launch stand, indicating it is on schedule for a controversial mid-April launch, according to a new analysis of satellite images.

The rocket isn’t visible at the Tongchang-ri site, but an analysis provided to The Associated Press by the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies says evidence suggests the first stage may be in the launch stand’s closed gantry, a support frame, ahead of the launch planned for April 12-16…

Launch preparation can also be seen in separate GeoEye satellite images from Saturday reviewed by Allison Puccioni, image analyst at IHS Jane’s Defense Weekly. The images show vehicles on the launch pad, nearby fuel and oxidizer containers and a crane above the launch tower that’s been placed “directly over the mobile launch platform, the position necessary to erect the rocket.”

View the full article

About GeoEye

Want to see more stunning and inspiring images?
GeoEye Facebook Fan Page
@GeoEye on Twitter
GeoEye on Google Plus
GeoEye on LinkedIn
GeoEye’s Flickr photo stream


New Satellite Image: More Activity at North Korea Launch Facility – GeoEye High Resolution Imagery Featured in CNN Article

A new image of the North Korean launch pad at Tongchang-dong Space Launch Center (see photo above the story) shows what IHS Jane’s Defense Weekly analyst Allison Puccioni says is “specific activity” on the pad, as well as at the rocket checkout assembly facility. The March 31 image was provided to CNN by GeoEye

…Puccioni compared the new image to a GeoEye image from March 20th and March 28th. She notes the gantry on the umbilical tower has changed directions and more vehicles and objects are seen parked around the launch tower. What are likely fuel containers have been uncovered and stacked behind the fuel system, according to Puccioni.

View the full article

About GeoEye

Want to see more stunning and inspiring images?
GeoEye Facebook Fan Page
@GeoEye on Twitter
GeoEye on Google Plus
GeoEye on LinkedIn
GeoEye’s Flickr photo stream


A New Neighborhood in Southeast – GeoEye High Resolution Imagery Featured in Washington Post Article

The area around Washington‘s new baseball stadium has been transformed from seedy nightclubs and light industry to apartments, offices and shops, but progress was severely slowed by the recession that hit as the new stadium opened.

Reporting by Jacqueline Dupree and Marc Fisher, Image Source: GeoEye, www.geoeye.com. Gene Thorp and Cristina Rivero/The Washington Post.Published on March 30, 2012, 7:06 p.m.

View the high resolution imagery

About GeoEye

Want to see more stunning and inspiring images?
GeoEye Facebook Fan Page
@GeoEye on Twitter
GeoEye on Google Plus
GeoEye on LinkedIn
GeoEye’s Flickr photo stream


Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture Before and After Images – GeoEye High Resolution Imagery Showcased

Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan (one year after 2011 earthquake/tsunami)

These high-resolution satellite images show the eastern coast of Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, almost one year after a 9.0-magnitude earthquake struck the Oshika Peninsula on March 11, 2011, which triggered a destructive tsunami. The before, half-meter resolution image (left) was taken by the GeoEye-1 satellite on Feb. 22, 2012 and the after, half-meter resolution image (right) was taken by the GeoEye-1 satellite on March 14, 2011. (GeoEye)

View the high resolution imagery

About GeoEye

Want to see more stunning and inspiring images?
GeoEye Facebook Fan Page
@GeoEye on Twitter
GeoEye on Google Plus
GeoEye on LinkedIn
GeoEye’s Flickr photo stream