Monthly Archives: February 2012

Geospatial Production Services – GeoEye Showcased

GeoEye takes clients to the next level by using the world’s most advanced digital processing techniques, a passion for leading the industry in technology development, and nearly three decades of experience.

Using high-resolution satellite and aerial imagery sources such as IKONOS, GeoEye-1, the DMC (Digital Mapping Camera) System, and LiDAR, we’re able to provide cost-effective solutions…

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GeoEye is Elevating Insight – Corporate Overview PDF

GeoEye is a leading source of geospatial information and insight for decision makers and analysts who need a clear understanding of our changing world to protect lives, manage risk, and optimize resources. Each day, organizations in defense and intelligence, public safety, critical infrastructure, energy, and online media rely on GeoEye’s imagery, tools, and expertise to support important missions around the globe. Widely recognized as a pioneer in high-resolution satellite imagery, GeoEye has evolved into a complete provider of geospatial intelligence solutions. GeoEye’s ability to collect, process, and analyze massive amounts of geospatial data allows our customers to quickly see precise changes on the ground and anticipate where events may occur in the future.

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GeoEye…Disaster Response With Satellite Tasking (Imagery)

[SatNews] GeoEye, Inc. (NASDAQ: GEOY) will jointly develop a new crisis response imagery service with Esri, the leading global geographic information software provider. This service, expected to be released this spring, will augment Esri’s current disaster response capability with GeoEye‘s ability to task its satellite to collect high-resolution satellite imagery after a crisis. Currently, Esri supports disaster and crisis response globally with best practices, technology and field response teams. GeoEye content plays a critical role in all aspects of disaster response. The new service will provide Esri and their user community access to timely and quality imagery during disasters.


This new bundled solution is critical as current world events escalate and first responders, government, and commercial risk organizations have the need to see, understand and respond to crisis events when lives and property are at risk. ArcGIS users will be able to leverage GeoEye’s map-accurate imagery and Esri tools to gain clear and timely insight before, during and after a crisis, emergency or global event.


Chris Tully, GeoEye’s senior vice president of sales, said, “We’re extremely pleased that Esri chose GeoEye as their imagery partner for this important work. Geospatial technology plays a critical role in determining where resources should be deployed most effectively after a crisis. We feel confident that Esri users will see immediate benefits when they leverage timely GeoEye event imagery and Esri support through this service.”


“Imagery plays a vital role during events,” says Russ Johnson, Esri’s director of Public Safety and Homeland Security. “It allows us to rapidly visualize impacts, analyze change and empower field teams conducting mobile operations. GeoEye and Esri share the same vision for supporting global incidents, and we are excited about what this means for users worldwide.”

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Rapid Satellite Imagery Service on the Way – GeoEye High Resolution Imagery Featured in UPI Article

A rapid-response satellite imagery service for crisis situations could be available as early as this spring from two U.S. companies.


The service from Virginia’s Esri, a geographic information software company, and GeoEye, another Virginia company, will enable more timely crisis response to disaster response.


“We’re extremely pleased that Esri chose GeoEye as their imagery partner for this important work,” said Chris Tully, GeoEye’s senior vice president of sales. “Geospatial technology plays a critical role in determining where resources should be deployed most effectively after a crisis.


“We feel confident that Esri users will see immediate benefits when they leverage timely GeoEye event imagery and Esri support through this service.”

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Esri and GeoEye Developing Global Crisis Response Service

GeoEye, Inc. (NASDAQ: GEOY), a leading source of geospatial information and insight, announced that it will jointly develop a new crisis response imagery service with Esri, the leading global geographic information software provider. This service, expected to be released this spring, will augment Esri’s current disaster response capability with GeoEye‘s ability to task its satellite to collect high-resolution satellite imagery after a crisis. Currently, Esri supports disaster and crisis response globally with best practices, technology and field response teams. GeoEye content plays a critical role in all aspects of disaster response. The new service will provide Esri and their user community access to timely and quality imagery during disasters

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Here’s the Site Iran Doesn’t Want Inspectors to See

Iran can banish U.N. inspectors from its military sites but it can’t obstruct the prying eyes of commercial satellites.

On Tuesday, officials from the International Atomic Energy Agency left Iran in a huff after the country refused to grant permission to inspect a military site in Parchin where a facility suspected of testing explosives exists. In light of Iran’s coyness about its facilities, we asked Mark Bender, executive director of the commercial satellite imagery company GeoEye, for a closer look.

The image above, provided to The Atlantic Wire, shows the sprawling Parchin military complex, which is 18 miles southeast of Tehran, taken from a GeoEye satellite 423 miles in space. We showed the image to Paul Brannan, who specializes in deciphering high-resolution satellite imagery for the Institute for Science and International Security, and he pointed to the areas marked in red as of interest to IAEA inspectors…

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MJ Harden Overview – GeoEye Production Services Showcased

MJ Harden Associates, Inc., a GeoEye company, offers a range of geospatial products and services to help you efficiently develop and manage your Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and to support engineering and development, documentation, and resource inventory applications.

Our services are based on more than 50 years of experience in aerial photography, photogrammetric mapping, GIS implementation, and geospatial Information Technology (IT) development. This experience, along with our wealth of technological expertise, is the value behind the services we offer—from consulting and planning to implementation, maintenance, and support.

Whether you are engineering for growth and progress, or updating existing GIS data, MJ Harden gives you the many advantages of the best geospatial technologies available…

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About GeoEye

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