Monthly Archives: January 2011

53 Years Looking Down – GeoEye (Elevating Insight) Featured in Euroscience Article

Fifty three years ago, on 31 January 1958, the first satellite for the observation of Earth was launched. Explorer 1 was the first satellite sent into orbit by the United States of America. In October 1957 the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 1 into space thus beginning the Cold War space race.

Today, more than 2,000 satellites are circling the Earth. Some are communication satellites only, but most satellites are built to observe the Earth. Optical systems on satellites like GeoEye or RapidEye (both private) allow optical resolutions of up to 50 centimetres, providing spectacular views of the Earth surface…

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Learn More about GeoEye and Our Industry

GeoEye101 is an online introduction to GeoEye‘s satellites, imagery products and services, and to the growing industry we lead. This site includes selected imagery, a brief history of the geospatial industry and an overview of our imagery products and services. Visit GeoEye 101.com

The Geospatial Revolution Project features a short video which offers an excellent overview of how geospatial imaging and GIS technologies work together in life- and world-changing ways. GeoEye is proud to be a first-in leadership funder for the Geospatial Revolution Project. View the video here or also at GeoEye 101.com

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About GeoEye

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@GeoEye on Twitter
GeoEye’s Flickr photo stream


2011 GeoEye Calendar – High Resolution Imagery Available on Facebook

This high resolution imagery is from GeoEye‘s 2011 Calendar Image Gallery posted on Facebook. View the rest of GeoEye‘s Image Galleries.

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About GeoEye

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@GeoEye on Twitter
GeoEye’s Flickr photo stream


The Dubai Airshow As Seen From Orbit – GeoEye High Resolution Imagery Showcased on Popsci

Our friend the GeoEye-1 satellite, which tirelessly photographs the world at half-meter resolution from its constant orbit, swung by the Dubai Airport the other day and took this snap of the Dubai Airshow, in progress this week. Thanks, GeoEye-1! The Dubai Airshow is the largest aerospace event in the Middle East and the fastest-growing airshow in the world.

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About GeoEye

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@GeoEye on Twitter
GeoEye’s Flickr photo stream


OrbView-2 and Oceanographic Data – GeoEye Information Services Showcased

GeoEye‘s Orbview-2 satellite (OV-2), with its SeaWiFS sensor, contributes to the study of ocean color, which benefits research on global warming and climate change, the monitoring of harmful algal blooms (red tides), the study of ecosystems, and other areas of great interest to society. Knowledge of ocean color provides our only large-scale window into the ocean ecosystem and is the only way to take a global view of the Earth‘s biosphere. Since water covers three quarters of the Earth, imagery from OrbView-2 helps us understand what is happening to the entire Earth’s ecosystem, water and land. OrbView-2 is considered the “gold standard” for ocean color measurements, and GeoEye is a proud contributor to the International Ocean-Color program with over 11 years of data…

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About GeoEye

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@GeoEye on Twitter
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Aviation Geospatial Solutions – GeoEye Production Services Showcased

Mapping the World’s Airports

How quickly can you circle the globe? At GeoEye, all we need is 1.5 hours. Every 98 minutes, GeoEye‘s state-of-the-art IKONOS satellite circles the Earth collecting single-pass, stereo-image data. This imagery is then used to construct geospatial Airport Mapping Databases (AMDBs) in accordance with the DO-272/ED-99 global standard…

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About GeoEye

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GeoEye’s Satellite Imagery Provides Insight for Photographic Expedition to Preserve Alacranes Reef – Case Study Featured on GeoEye Site

Working with the International League of Conservation Photographers, Ben Horton utilized GeoEye imagery to photograph the threatened ecosystem of the Alacranes reef in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the league’s Rapid Assessment Visual Expedition (RAVE) project. The largest reef system in the Gulf of Mexico, the Alacranes reef is threatened by overfishing and illegal conch gathering. In addition, the coral is dying from the toxins released into the water from the boats…

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About GeoEye

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@GeoEye on Twitter
GeoEye’s Flickr photo stream